Global Financial Integrity

 

Tagged ‘United Nations’

Moving Towards a Clear SDG to Halve Trade Misinvoicing by 2030

Mexico and Bangladesh Voice Support for a Clear Target on Curbing Illicit Financial Flows on the Sustainable Development Agenda

The United Nations is in the process of forming the post-2015 development agenda. These proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) will eventually replace the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) that were agreed upon for 2000-2015. As with the MDGs, the SDGs will inform which development issues take priority in the coming years.

Sustainable Development Goal 16.4, as is currently proposed by the UN’s Open Working Group, calls on the international community to:

“by 2030 reduce illicit financial and arms flows, strengthen recovery and return of stolen assets, and combat all forms of organized crime.”

Global Financial Integrity (GFI) applauds the Open Working Group for considering illicit financial flows in its proposal. Though Goal 16.4 is definitely a start in the right direction, it is not exclusively focused on illicit financial flows, nor is it measurable in the least. GFI proposes the following as an alternative:

“by 2030, reduce illicit financial flows related to trade misinvoicing by 50%.”

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Opportunity Knocks to Address Illicit Financial Flows

GFI Calls for a Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) to Halve Illicit Flows from Trade Misinvoicing by 2030

As I noted in yesterday’s post, the momentum toward global action on illicit flows by the international community (i.e. the United Nations, OECD, G20, etc) has grown substantially over the past three years.  Indeed, last October, the World Bank Group noted that “there is little doubt that [illicit] flows have a pernicious impact on development” and the UN group working on development financing said that “domestic resource mobilization is being severely undermined by illicit financial flows.”  And, in January, the African Union stated that “it is imperative to curtail illicit financial flows [to ensure] the efficient and effective use of resources.”

But, while there is an understanding of the problem and a willingness to act, there is no broad consensus on what should be done.  The opportunity that presents itself comes from a once-in-a-generation confluence:

  1. the international community agreeing on the need to reduce illicit financial flows (IFFs), and
  2. 2) the fact that the Post-2015 development agenda is open for debate.

The political will already exists to address the IFF challenge in concrete ways.  Now, the question is: what does a SMART (i.e. Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Relevant, Time-bound) SDG target on illicit flows look like?

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The “Big Mo” in the Drive to Address Illicit Financial Flows

GFI Participates in High Level OECD Side-Event on Curbing Illicit Flows during UN General Assembly Meetings

On September 24th, tucked away in a quiet conference room in the basement of the UN General Assembly building, an extraordinary conversation took place on the future of global development.  But, despite the gathering of representatives from the OECD, UN, World Bank, USAID and the Mexican, Australian, and Nigerian governments, the event received exactly zero media coverage.

Titled “Curbing Illicit Financial Flows for Domestic Resource Mobilization and Sustainable Development in the Post-2015 Era,” the focal point of the two-hour discussion was how the international community could, as the program description put it, “identify concrete international actions needed” to curtail illicit financial flows out of developing country economies.  While other events were given more airtime and other issues may require more immediate attention, some ideas presented at the panel could be transformational in terms of how countries address the scourge of illicit flows and how the development agenda is funded.

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