Global Financial Integrity

 

Campaigners Send Strong Message to G20 on Corruption

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Monique Perry Danziger, +1 202 293 0740 ext. 222

Swift Action, Transparency, and Collaboration Critical in Tackling Corruption

WASHINGTON, DC – Global Financial Integrity (GFI) joined 76 civil society organizations in calling upon the G20 to take action on corruption. In a letter submitted to G20 officials last week, the civil society groups affirmed their support for the G20’s work combating corruption, urged swift action and made recommendations.

“Corruption—bribery and kleptocracy, repression and despotism—has pushed Egypt and Tunisia to revolution,” said GFI Director Raymond Baker. “The proof is irrefutable; the time for substantive change is here. The G20 must act swiftly and resolutely to follow through with the Anti-Corruption Action Plan announced in Seoul last November.”

The letter makes recommendations on a range of issues, including:

  1. Ratification and Implementation of the UN Convention Against Corruption (UNCAC);
  2. Adoption and enforcement of international anti-bribery measures;
  3. Anti Money Laundering efforts;
  4. Entry of corrupt officials into G20 countries;
  5. International cooperation;
  6. Recovering the proceeds of corruption;
  7. Protection of whistleblowers;
  8. Effective functioning of anti-corruption bodies and enforcement authorities;
  9. Preventing corruption in the public sector;
  10. Governance of international organizations; and
  11. Public/private partnerships, including sector specific projects.

“Many of our recommendations are covered by the G20’s Anti-Corruption Action Plan,” said Heather Lowe, GFI director of goverment affairs. “The key ‘ask’ in our letter is for greater transparency in the global financial system, overall. We also stress the need for civil society input into the G20 process.”

Click here to download a full copy of the letter in PDF format (41 Kb).

Click here to download a full copy of the G20 Anti-Corruption Action Plan released at the Seoul Summit in November 2010.

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