Global Financial Integrity

 

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The Business of Transnational Crime

The groups engaged in transnational organized crime—from criminal networks to insurgent groups to terrorist organizations—are united by a common thread: money. All of the crimes covered in Global Financial Integrity’s new report Transnational Crime and the Developing World are overwhelmingly profit-motivated. Globally, transnational crime has an average annual retail value of $1.6 billion to $2.2 billion, based on 11 “industries”: counterfeiting and piracy, drug trafficking, illegal logging, human trafficking, illegal mining, illegal fishing, the illegal wildlife trade, crude oil theft, the trafficking of small arms and light weapons, the illegal organ trade, and the trafficking of cultural property.

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Illicit Financial Flows, Corruption, and Sustainable Economic Development in Tunisia

By Sami Dabbegh Since the outbreak of the so-called “Jasmine Revolution” five years ago, leading to the ouster of former president Ben Ali, Tunisia’s key economic and social problems have not been tackled in a way that...

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Stop the Bleeding — Curbing Illicit Financial Flows Video Recap

By Tim Hirschel-Burns “A global human society, characterised by islands of wealth, surrounded by a sea of poverty, is unsustainable.” This quote from Thabo Mbeki, the former president of South Africa, concludes the recently released video “Stop...

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UN’s ECOSOC Youth Forum: “Youth Taking Action to Implement the 2030 Agenda”

On February 1st through 2nd, I and other youth representatives from around the world met at the UN’s ECOSOC Youth Forum to discuss how we can actively influence the implementation of the recently adopted Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). A highlight of the event was a speech by Mr. Ahmad Alhendawi, the UN Secretary-General’s Special Envoy on Youth, who argued for his “Ten Myths about Youth,” in which he asserted that youth are not the future, seeing as we comprise so much of the world today and are directly and immediately affected by any decisions that take place. Youth are as much the present as any other group in society—participating youth repeatedly expressed their concerns about the current lack of employment opportunities (in advanced and developing economies alike). High levels of youth unemployment are correlated with major losses in human capital development, income and employment stability, and aggregate economic gains.

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Companies in extractive industries report their payments to governments more, but more work is needed

For over a decade now, various global initiatives have promoted the design and implementation of international standards for governments and companies in the extractive sector to publish detailed information about their output and revenues. In 2002, after major corruption scandals emerged in Angola, Publish What You Pay (PWYP; a global coalition of civil society organizations) demanded oil, gas and mining companies to publish what they paid governments.

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GFI to Launch Myanmar Report with Panel Including Dev Kar, Vikram Nehru, Aaretti Siitonen

Flight Capital and Illicit Financial Flows to and from Myanmar: 1960-2013

Please join Global Financial Integrity (GFI) for a panel discussion on Thursday, September 10 at the National Press Club in Washington, DC. Based on a forthcoming report by GFI, the panel will discuss the dynamics of illicit financial flows (IFFs) and economic opacity in Myanmar since 1960, and the economic ramifications these trends have had and continue to have on the country’s development.

The panel will include:

Dev Kar
Chief Economist
Global Financial Integrity

Vikram Nehru
Senior Associate, Asia Program
Bakrie Chair in Southeast Asia Studies
Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Aaretti Siitonen
First Secretary
Embassy of Finland

And will be moderated by:

Tom Cardamone
Managing Director
Global Financial Integrity

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GFI Seeks Consultant for Open Data Scoping Study

We have the financial transparency ideas, now we need the right open data standards to go with them!

As a member of the Financial Transparency Coalition (FTC), Global Financial Integrity is seeking proposals from experts in the area of data standards for a consultant to produce a scoping study that identifies the range of open data standards that might accompany the FTC’s transparency platform and an assessment of the related political challenges and opportunities.

Deadline for applications is August 21 ! Please see the Request for Proposals (RFP) for complete information.

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